Creating Plugins to Share Structures, Templates, and More

Have you ever wanted to share page templates with other users? Are colleagues and clients banging at your door to get hold of the structures and templates you use for your web content articles and wikis? If so, you can bundle these up in a Liferay plugin to distribute to them. You can even put them in a Marketplace app for them to purchase. When they install your plugin, its templates and structures are automatically imported into their portal’s global site. How is this possible? The Templates Importer feature of the resources importer app makes it happen! The Resources Importer is available from Liferay Marketplace.

The Templates Importer is a part of the Resources Importer app. It lets you import the following resources:

  • Page templates
  • Web content structures and templates
  • Application Display Templates (ADTs) for any portlet that supports ADTs, such as the Asset Publisher, Blogs, Tags Navigation, Categories Navigation, Documents and Media, Site Map, and Wiki portlets.
  • DDL structures and templates, including display templates and form templates.

Although you can include the template importing capability in any Liferay plugin, they’re especially useful for Liferay themes. When developers upload themes to Liferay Marketplace, it’s very convenient for them to be able to bundle sample content with the theme so that the theme can be viewed in an appropriate context. Please refer to the Importing Resources with Your Themes tutorial for instructions on using the Resources Importer with theme plugins. Behind themes, portlet plugins are the most common type of plugin used for importing templates. Let’s build a portlet plugin that imports some web content structures and templates.

  1. If the Resources Importer is not already installed on your portal, visit Liferay Marketplace to download and install it.

  2. Create a portlet plugin project with the name of your choice. For example, create a portlet plugin project called sample-templates-importer-portlet.

  3. Edit your liferay-plugin-package.properties file to include the following property settings:

    name=
    
    required-deployment-contexts=\
        resources-importer-web
    
    resources-importer-developer-mode-enabled=true
    
    module-incremental-version=1
    

    Here’s a summary of what we’re accomplishing with these settings: - We remove the plugin’s name value to prevent the portal from displaying the plugin as an available app. - Since the Templates Importer feature resides in the Resources Importer web plugin, we include it as a required context. - By enabling developer mode, if the templates we’re importing to the Global site already exist on it, the Templates Importer conveniently overwrites them. - We set the module increment version to 1 since 1 is an appropriate version starting point for the plugin’s version.

  4. Edit the portlet’s portlet.xml file and delete the value of its display-name element to keep the portal from displaying the portlet as an available app.

  5. Create a folder named templates-importer in the plugin’s WEB-INF\src folder. This folder will hold all of the structures and templates to import into the portal’s Global site.

Let’s stop here for a moment and consider how to specify templates and structures. The Templates Importer expects them to be specified in a directory structure under the plugin project’s templates-importer folder. You must create folders to contain the template and structure files to apply to the portal.

Here’s the directory structure to follow for specifying folders to contain your structures and templates:

  • templates-importer/
    • journal/
      • structures/ - contains structures (XML) and folders of child structures. Each folder name must match the file name of the corresponding parent structure. For example, to include a child structure of parent structure Parent 1.xml, create a folder named Parent 1/ at the same level as the Parent 1.xml file, for holding a child structures.
      • templates/ - groups templates (FTL or VM) into folders by structure. Each folder name must match the file name of the corresponding structure. For example, create folder Structure 1/ to hold a template for structure file Structure 1.xml.
    • templates/
      • application_display/ - contains application display template (ADT) script files written in either the FreeMarker Template Language (.ftl) or Velocity (.vm). The extension of the files, .ftl for FreeMarker or .vm for Velocity must reflect the language that the templates are written in.
        • asset_category/ - contains categories navigation templates
        • asset_entry/ - contains asset publisher templates
        • asset_tag/ - contains tags navigation templates
        • blogs_entry/ - contains blogs templates
        • document_library/ - contains documents and media templates
        • site_map/ - contains site map templates
        • wiki_page/ - contains wiki templates
      • dynamic_data_list/ - contains dynamic data list templates and structures
        • display_template/ - groups templates (FTL or VM) into folders by structure. Each folder name must match the file name of the corresponding structure. For example, create folder Structure 1/ to hold a template for structure file Structure 1.xml.
        • form_template/ - groups templates (FTL or VM) into folders by structure. Each folder name must match the file name of the corresponding structure. For example, create folder Structure 1/ to hold a template for structure file Structure 1.xml.
        • structure/ - contains structures (XML)
      • page/ - contains page templates (JSON)

For structures and templates in your custom plugins, you only need to create folders to support the templates and/or structures you’re adding.

We’ve provided a ZIP file of the folders, templates, and structures for the example sample-templates-importer-portlet plugin. To obtain this example content, please take the following steps:

  1. Download the file sample-templates-importer-contents.zip.

  2. Extract its contents into the templates-importer folder of the sample-templates-importer-portlet plugin.

  3. Deploy the sample-templates-importer-portlet plugin into a Liferay instance.

    The console output should be similar to this:

    INFO  [localhost-startStop-8][PortletHotDeployListener:343] Registering portlets for sample-templates-importer-portlet
    INFO  [localhost-startStop-8][PortletHotDeployListener:490] 1 portlet for sample-templates-importer-portlet is available 
    for use
    INFO  [liferay/hot_deploy-1][ResourcesImporterHotDeployMessageListener:256] Importing resources from sample-templates-
    importer-portlet to group 10194 takes 1294 ms
    ...
    
  4. View your resources from within Liferay. Log in to your portal as an administrator and check the Global site to make sure that your resources were deployed correctly. Here’s how you can use the Control Panel to view your structures and templates:

    1. Go to Sites in the Control Panel.
    2. Select the Global site.
    3. You can view the imported structures and templates here:
      • The Journal Article structures and templates can be viewed in the Web Content Control Panel portlet → ManageStructures or ManageTemplates .
      • The Dynamic Data List templates can be viewed in the Dynamic Data Lists Control Panel portlet → Manage Data Definitions. The templates can be viewed by going to the Actions menu of the Dynamic Data List structure and then clicking on Manage Templates.
      • The Application Display templates can be viewed under the Configuration category → Application Display Templates.
      • The page templates can be viewed in the Page Templates category from the Control Panel menu.

The figure below shows some of the ADTs that were imported.

templates-importer-adts.png

Figure 1: The Templates Importer allows users to import all kinds of structures and templates, such as these application display templates.

As you take a look around the folders and files within the plugin’s templates-importer folder, notice the different kinds of templates and structures.

Page templates are specified in .json files in the templates-importer/templates/page folder. Each one specifies the layout template, web content, assets, and portlet configurations to be imported with that page template.

Here is the contents of the page_3.json file:

{
  "layoutTemplate": {
    "columns": [
      [
        {
          "portletId": "58"
        }
      ],
      [
        {
          "portletId": "47"
        },
        {
          "portletId": "118",
          "portletPreferences": {
            "columns": [
              [
                {
                  "portletId": "3"
                }
              ],
              [
                {
                  "portletId": "16"
                }
              ]
            ],
            "layoutTemplateId": "2_columns_i"
          }
        }
      ]
    ],
    "friendlyURL": "/page-3",
    "name": "Page 3",
    "title": "Page 3"
  },
  "layoutTemplateId": "2_columns_ii"
}

At the bottom of the JSON file, there are several important specifications for the page template. The layoutTemplateId references the layout template to use for the page. You can specify different layout templates to use for individual pages. You can find layout templates in your Liferay installation’s /layouttpl folder. You can specify a name, title, and friendly URL for the page using the respective name, title, and friendlyURL fields. And, although it’s not demonstrated in this page template, you can even set a page to be hidden.

Turning your attention to the columns of the JSON file, notice that you can declare portlets by specifying their portlet IDs. To look up the IDs of Liferay’s core portlets, see the WEB-INF/portlet-custom.xml file deployed in Liferay on your app server. If you’re using the Web Content portlet, you can declare articles to be displayed on a page, by specifying HTML files. Interestingly, the page_3.json file demonstrates using the Nested Portlets portlet to display other portlets: the Search and Currency Converter portlets. Lastly, you can also specify portlet preferences for each portlet using the portletPreferences field.

The figure below shows a page created using the Page 3 template.

templates-importer-page-3-template.png

Figure 2: Users can create pages, like this one, prepopulated with portlets and content that you’ve specified in your plugins, that leverage the Templates Importer.

Now that you’ve learned about the directory structure for your templates and the JSON file for the page templates, it’s time to learn how to put template and structure files into your plugin. You can create structures and templates from scratch and/or leverage ones you’ve already created in Liferay. Let’s go over how to leverage bringing in XML (structures) and FTL or VM template files from Liferay.

The sections below explain how to create structure and template files to put within the defined directory structure of the portlet’s templates-importer/ folder.

Structure:

  • Dynamic Data Lists: Edit the structure by clicking on Manage Data Definitions. Click on a structure that you want to export and then click on the Source tab. Copy and paste its contents into a new XML file for the structure in the templates-importer/journal/dynamic_data_list/structure folder. The structure XML sets a wireframe, or blueprint, for a dynamic data list’s data.
  • Web Content: Edit the structure by clicking on Manage and then Structures. Click on a structure that you want to export and then click on the Source tab. Copy and paste its contents into a new XML file for the structure in the templates-importer/journal/structures/ folder. The structure XML sets a wireframe, or blueprint, for an article’s data.

Template:

  • Application Display: Edit the template by clicking on the template you want to export. Copy and paste its contents into a new FTL or VM file and place it in templates-importer/templates/application_display/[your application display template type]/.
  • Dynamic Data List: Edit the template by clicking on Manage Data Definition. Click on Manage Templates from the Actions menu of the structure that your template is linked to. Choose the template that you want to export. Copy and paste its contents into a new FTL or VM file and place it in templates-importer/templates/display_template/[structure name]/ or templates-importer/templates/form_template/[structure name]/
  • Page: You will have to create the page template from scratch based on the .json file example for the page template above.

Importantly, you must name the files of all structures and templates, except page templates, after their source structures and templates. You can go back to any of the beginning steps in this section to make refinements to the sample plugin to try importing different structures and templates. The final sample-templates-importer-portlet project is available here.

As you’ve seen for yourself, importing structures and templates with your plugin isn’t difficult at all. The Resource Importer app’s Templates Importer feature makes it easy. Have fun distributing your structures and templates!

Related Topics

Customizing Sites and Site Templates with Application Adapters

Advanced Content with Structures and Templates

0 (0 Votes)
Importing Resources Previous