Many default Liferay Portal services are available as web services. Liferay Portal exposes its web services via JSON and SOAP web services. If you’re running the portal locally on port 8080, visit the following URL to browse Liferay Portal’s default JSON web services:

http://localhost:8080/api/jsonws/

To browse Liferay Portal’s default SOAP web services, visit this URL:

http://localhost:8080/api/axis

These web services APIs can be accessed by many different kinds of clients, including non-portlet and even non-Java clients. You can use Service Builder to generate similar remote services for your projects’ custom entities. When you run Service Builder with the remote-service attribute set to true for an entity, all the classes, interfaces, and files required to support both SOAP and JSON web services are generated for that entity. Service Builder generates methods that call existing services, but it’s up to you to implement the methods that are exposed remotely. In this tutorial, you’ll learn how to generate remote services for your application. When you’re done, your application’s remote service methods can be called remotely via JSON and SOAP web services.

Using Service Builder to Generate Remote Services

Remember that you should implement your application’s local service methods in *LocalServiceImpl. You should implement your application’s remote service methods in *ServiceImpl.

As an example, consider Liferay Portal’s Blogs app. Articles are represented by the JournalArticle entity. This entity is declared in the journal-service module’s service.xml file with the remote-service attribute set to true. Service Builder therefore generates the remote service class JournalArticleServiceImpl to hold the remote service method implementations. If you were developing this app from scratch, this class would initially be empty; you must use it to implement the entity’s remote service methods. Also, note that the remote service method implementations in JournalArticleServiceImpl follow best practice by checking permissions and calling the corresponding local service method. For example, each addArticle method in JournalArticleServiceImpl checks permissions via the custom permissions class JournalFolderPermission and then calls the local service’s matching addArticle method:

@Override
public JournalArticle addArticle(...)
    throws PortalException {

    JournalFolderPermission.check(
        getPermissionChecker(), groupId, folderId, ActionKeys.ADD_ARTICLE);

    return journalArticleLocalService.addArticle(...);
}

You’ll also need to develop custom permissions classes for each entity you need to perform permissions checks on. Also note that the local service is called via the journalArticleLocalService field. This is a Spring bean of type JournalArticleLocalServiceImpl that’s injected into JournalArticleServiceImpl by Service Builder. See the class JournalArticleServiceBaseImpl for a complete list of Spring beans available in JournalArticleServiceImpl.

After you’ve finished adding remote service methods to your *ServiceImpl class, save it and run Service Builder again. After running Service Builder, deploy your project and check the Liferay Portal JSON web services URL http://localhost:8080/api/jsonws/ to make sure that your remote services appear when you select your application’s context path.

Nice work! You’ve successfully used Service Builder to generate your app’s remote services. To make these services available via SOAP, however, you must build and deploy your app’s Web Service Deployment Descriptor (WSDD). The next section shows you how to do this. If you don’t need to generate SOAP web services, you can move on to the tutorial Invoking Remote Services.

Generating Your App’s WSDD

Liferay Portal uses Apache Axis to make SOAP web services available. Since Axis requires a WSDD to make an app’s remote services available via SOAP, you must build and deploy a WSDD for your app. To create your WSDD, you must install Liferay’s WSDD Builder Gradle plugin in your app’s project. How you do this, however, depends on what kind of project you have. For multi-module projects like a Service Builder project in a Liferay Workspace, you’ll install the plugin via the workspace’s settings.gradle file. This applies the WSDD Builder plugin to every module in the workspace that uses Service Builder (typically the *-api and *-service modules). If you have a standalone *-service module that uses Service Builder, however, you’ll install the WSDD Builder plugin in the module’s build.gradle file.

The next section shows you how to install the WSDD builder in a multi-module project. If you have a standalone module project, skip ahead to the section Installing the WSDD Builder Plugin in a Standalone Module Project.

Installing the WSDD Builder Plugin in a Multi-module Project

To install the WSDD Builder plugin in a multi-module project like a Service Builder project in a Liferay Workspace, do the following in the workspace’s settings.gradle file:

  1. Add the ServiceBuilderPlugin and WSDDBuilderPlugin imports to the top of the file:

    import com.liferay.gradle.plugins.service.builder.ServiceBuilderPlugin
    import com.liferay.gradle.plugins.wsdd.builder.WSDDBuilderPlugin
    
  2. In the repositories block, add the Liferay CDN repository via Maven:

    repositories {
        maven {
            url "https://repository-cdn.liferay.com/nexus/content/groups/public"
        }
    }
    

    This repository hosts the WSDD Builder library, its transitive dependencies, and other Liferay libraries. Note that if you created your Service Builder project with the service-builder template in Blade CLI or Liferay IDE, then your settings.gradle file should already contain this.

  3. Add this code to the end of the file:

    gradle.beforeProject {
        project ->
    
        project.plugins.withType(ServiceBuilderPlugin) {
            project.apply plugin: WSDDBuilderPlugin
        }
    }
    

    This is the code that applies the WSDD Builder plugin in every module in the Liferay Workspace that uses Service Builder. Your settings.gradle file should now look something like this:

    import com.liferay.gradle.plugins.service.builder.ServiceBuilderPlugin
    import com.liferay.gradle.plugins.wsdd.builder.WSDDBuilderPlugin
    
    buildscript {
        dependencies {
            classpath group: "com.liferay", name: "com.liferay.gradle.plugins.workspace", version: "1.2.0"
        }
    
        repositories {
            maven {
                url "https://repository-cdn.liferay.com/nexus/content/groups/public"
            }
        }
    }
    
    apply plugin: "com.liferay.workspace"
    
    gradle.beforeProject {
        project ->
    
        project.plugins.withType(ServiceBuilderPlugin) {
            project.apply plugin: WSDDBuilderPlugin
        }
    }
    
  4. Refresh the Liferay Workspace’s Gradle project. Close and restart Liferay IDE if you’re using it.

Now that you’ve installed the WSDD Builder plugin, you’re ready to build and deploy the WSDD. For instructions on this, proceed to the section Building and Deploying the WSDD.

Installing the WSDD Builder Plugin in a Standalone Module Project

To install the WSDD Builder plugin in a standalone *-service module that uses Service Builder, do the following in the module’s build.gradle file:

  1. Add the plugin as a dependency in your buildscript.
  2. Add the Liferay CDN repository via Maven.
  3. Apply the plugin to your project.

For example, the following part of an example build.gradle file in a standalone *-service module includes the WSDD Builder plugin and applies it to the project:

buildscript {
    dependencies {
        classpath group: "com.liferay", name: "com.liferay.gradle.plugins.wsdd.builder", version: "1.0.9"
    }

    repositories {
        maven {
            url "https://repository-cdn.liferay.com/nexus/content/groups/public"
        }
    }
}

apply plugin: "com.liferay.portal.tools.wsdd.builder"

Now you’re ready to build and deploy the WSDD. The next section shows you how to do this.

Building and Deploying the WSDD

To build the WSDD, you must run the buildWSDD Gradle task in your *-service module. Exactly how you do this depends on your development tools:

  • Liferay IDE: From the Liferay Workspace perspective’s Gradle Tasks pane (typically on the right), open your *-service module’s build folder and double-click buildWSDD.
  • Command Line: Navigate to your *-service module and run ../../../gradlew buildWSDD. Note that the exact location of the Gradle wrapper (gradlew) may vary. For Liferay Workspace projects, it’s typically in the root workspace folder.

So what should you do if buildWSDD fails? A common cause of buildWSDD failures is failing to satisfy the dependencies needed by the WSDD Builder for your *-service module. Note that these dependencies vary depending on your project’s code–there’s no standard set. That said, the following are often required for portlet development:

compileOnly group: "javax.portlet", name: "portlet-api", version: "2.0"
compileOnly group: "javax.servlet", name: "javax.servlet-api", version: "3.0.1"
compileOnly group: "com.liferay", name: "com.liferay.registry.api", version: "1.0.0"

Click here for more information on finding and configuring dependencies for your apps.

In your *-service project’s build/libs folder, the buildWSDD task generated a *-service-wsdd-[version].jar file that contains your WSDD. Deploy this JAR to your Liferay Portal instance. Your SOAP web services are then available at a URL that uses the following pattern:

yourportaladdress/o/your.apps.service.module.context/api/axis

For example, if an app called Foo consists of the modules foo-api, foo-service, and foo-web, then the app’s service module context is foo-service. If this app is deployed to a local Liferay Portal instance running at http://localhost:8080, you could access its SOAP services at:

http://localhost:8080/o/foo-service/api/axis

If you don’t know an app’s *-service module context, you can find it by searching for the app in the App Manager of the Liferay Portal instance in which the app is running. For example, the following screenshot shows the Foo app’s modules in the App Manager. The name of the *-service module in the App Manager, foo-service, is also its context. Also note that the app’s WSDD module is grayed out and listed as Resolved instead of Active. This is normal. WSDD modules are OSGi fragments, which can’t be activated. They still work as intended, though.

app-manager-remote-services.png

Figure 1: To find your app’s modules, including its WSDD module, search for your app in the App Manager. The *-service module’s name in the App Manager is also the module’s context.

Next, you’ll learn how to build the WSDD module for Liferay Portal’s built-in apps that don’t include a WSDD by default. If you don’t need to do this, you can move on to the tutorial Invoking Remote Services.

Building the WSDD for Built-in Liferay Portal Apps

Liferay Portal doesn’t provide WSDD modules for built-in apps that exist outside of the portal context. This means that by default you can’t access SOAP web services for apps like Bookmarks or Blogs. To make SOAP web services available for such an app, you must build and deploy its WSDD from the liferay-portal GitHub repository. The apps are in the liferay-portal/modules/apps folder. Note that to build WSDDs for these apps, you must first download the liferay-portal source code to your machine. You’ll run the WSDD build from your local liferay-portal copy.

When you build an app’s WSDD, make sure to use gradlew in liferay-portal instead of the gradle on your machine. After building, you can find the WSDD JAR in the tools/sdk/dist folder of your local liferay-portal copy. Otherwise, building an app’s WSDD is the same as in the preceding section.

For example, to build the WSDD for the Bookmarks app, first navigate to the liferay-portal/modules/apps/collaboration/bookmarks/bookmarks-service folder in your terminal. Then run the following command:

../../../../../gradlew buildWSDD

Next, deploy the liferay-portal/tools/sdk/dist/com.liferay.bookmarks.service-wsdd-[version].jar to your Liferay Portal instance. If your instance is running locally on localhost:8080, you should then be able to view the Bookmarks app’s SOAP services at http://localhost:8080/o/com.liferay.bookmarks.service/api/axis.

Fantastic! Once you’ve created remote web services, you’ll want to know how to invoke them. To learn how, see the tutorial Invoking Remote Services.

Related Topics

Invoking Remote Services

Invoking JSON Web Services

JSON Web Services Invoker

JSON Web Services Invocation Examples

What is Service Builder?

0 (0 Votes)
Service Builder Web Services Previous