The Control Menu is the most visible and accessible menu in Liferay. It is visible to the user in most places, always displaying helpful text or options at the top of the page. For example, on your home page, the Control Menu offers default options for accessing the Product Menu, Simulation Menu, and Add Menu. You can think of this menu as the gateway to configuring options in Liferay.

control-menu-home.png

Figure 1: The Control Menu has three configurable areas: left, right, and middle.

If you navigate away from the home page, the Control Menu adapts and provides helpful functionality for what ever option you’re using. For example, if you navigated to Site Administration → ContentWeb Content, you’d be displayed a Control Menu with different functionality tailored for that option.

control-menu-web-content.png

Figure 2: When switching your context to web content, the Control Menu adapts to provide helpful options for that area.

The default Control Menu is made up of three categories that represent the left, middle, and right portions of the menu. You can create navigation entries for each category, which can provide options or further navigation for the particular screen you’re on.

You can reference a sample Control Menu Entry by visiting the Control Menu Entry article.

In this tutorial, you’ll learn how to create your own entries to customize the Control Menu. Make sure to read the Adding Custom Panel Categories before beginning this tutorial. This tutorial assumes you have knowledge on creating a panel category. You’ll begin by creating an entry for the Control Menu.

  1. Create a generic OSGi module using your favorite third party tool, or use Blade CLI. Your module must contain a Java class, bnd.bnd file, and build file (e.g., build.gradle or pom.xml). You’ll create your Java class next if your project does not already define one.

  2. Create a unique package name in the module’s src directory and create a new Java class in that package. To follow naming conventions, give your class a unique name followed by ProductNavigationControlMenuEntry (e.g., StagingProductNavigationControlMenuEntry).

  3. Directly above the class’s declaration, insert the following annotation:

    @Component(
        immediate = true,
        property = {
            "product.navigation.control.menu.category.key=" + [Control Menu Category],
            "product.navigation.control.menu.category.order:Integer=[int]"
        },
        service = ProductNavigationControlMenuEntry.class
    )
    

    The product.navigation.control.menu.category.key property specifies the category your entry should reside in. As mentioned previously, the default Control Menu provides three categories: Sites (left portion), Tools (middle portion), and User (right portion).

    control-menu-areas.png

    Figure 3: This image shows where your entry will reside depending on the category you select.

    To specify the category, reference the appropriate key in the ProductNavigationControlMenuCategoryKeys class. For example, the following property would place your entry in the middle portion of the Control Menu:

    "product.navigation.control.menu.category.key=" + ProductNavigationControlMenuCategoryKeys.TOOLS
    

    Similar to panel categories, you’ll also need to specify an integer for the order in which your entry will be displayed in the category. Entries are ordered from left to right. For example, an entry with order 1 will be listed to the left of an entry with order 2. If the order is not specified, it’s chosen at random based on which service was registered first in the OSGi container. Lastly, your service element should specify the ProductNavigationControlMenuEntry.class service.

  4. Implement the ProductNavigationControlMenuEntry interface. You can also extend the BaseProductNavigationControlMenuEntry or BaseJSPProductNavigationControlMenuEntry abstract classes. Typically, the BaseProductNavigationControlMenuEntry is extended for basic entries (e.g., IndexingProductNavigationControlMenuEntry) that only display a link with text or a simple icon. If you’d like to provide a more complex UI, like buttons or a sub-menu, you can do so by overriding the include() and includeBody() methods. If you are going to use JSPs for generating the UI, you can extend BaseJSPProductNavigationControlMenuEntry to save time. This will be elaborated on more extensively in the next step.

  5. Define your Control Menu entry. You’ll explore two examples to discover some options you have available for defining your entry. First, let’s take a look at a simple example for providing text and an icon. The IndexingProductNavigationControlMenuEntry extends the BaseProductNavigationControlMenuEntry class and is used when Liferay is indexing. For this process, the indexing entry is displayed in the Tools (middle) area of the Control Menu with a Refresh icon and text stating The Portal is currently indexing. The icon is defined by calling the following method:

    @Override
    public String getIcon(HttpServletRequest request) {
        return "reload";
    }
    

    By default, Lexicon icons are expected to be returned. This is because the BaseProductNavigationControlMenuEntry.getMarkupView method returns lexicon. To view all the Lexicon icons available, see https://liferay.github.io/clay/content/icons-lexicon/. You can also return FontAwesome icons, but you must implement the ProductNavigationControlMenuEntry.getMarkupView(…) method in your class and have it return null. Then you can return FontAwesome icons for the getIcon(...) method. To view all the FontAwesome icons available, see the FontAwesome 4.6.1 docs.

    You can also provide a label for the Control Menu entry that displays when hovering over it with your pointer. This label is stored in the module’s resource bundle, which you can learn more about in the Internationalization tutorials.

    @Override
    public String getLabel(Locale locale) {
        ResourceBundle resourceBundle = ResourceBundleUtil.getBundle(
            "content.Language", locale, getClass());
    
        return LanguageUtil.get(
            resourceBundle, "the-portal-is-currently-reindexing");
    }
    

    To do this, you’ll need to create a Language.properties for your module.

    You also have the option to provide a Lexicon or CSS icon in your *ControlMenuEntry. To use a Lexicon icon, you should override the methods in ProductMenuProductNavigationControlMenuEntry like the following:

    public String getIconCssClass(HttpServletRequest request) {
        return "";
    }
    
    public String getIcon(HttpServletRequest request) {
        return "lexicon-icon";
    }
    
    public String getMarkupView(HttpServletRequest request) {
        return "lexicon";
    }
    

    Likewise, you can use a CSS icon by overriding the ProductMenuProductNavigationControlMenuEntry methods like the following:

    public String getIconCssClass(HttpServletRequest request) {
        return "icon-css";
    }
    
    public String getIcon(HttpServletRequest request) {
        return "";
    }
    
    public String getMarkupView(HttpServletRequest request) {
        return "";
    }
    

    The icons used in the two examples for Lexicon and CSS icons can be found in the icons-lexicon and icons-font-awesome components, respectively.

    The ProductMenuProductNavigationControlMenuEntry is a more advanced example. This entry displays in the Sites (left) area of the Control Menu, but unlike the previous example, it extends the BaseJSPProductNavigationControlMenuEntry class. This provides several more methods that lets you use JSPs to define your entry’s UI. There are two methods to pay special attention to:

    @Override
    public String getBodyJspPath() {
        return "/portlet/control_menu/product_menu_control_menu_entry_body.jsp";
    }
    
    @Override
    public String getIconJspPath() {
        return "/portlet/control_menu/product_menu_control_menu_entry_icon.jsp";
    }
    

    The getIconJspPath() method provides the Product Menu icon (icon-menu.pngicon-menu-open.png) and the getBodyJspPath() method adds the UI body for the entry outside of the Control Menu. The latter method must be used when providing a UI outside the Control Menu. You can easily test this when you open and close the Product Menu on the home page.

    Lastly, if you’re planning on providing functionality that will stay exclusively inside the Control Menu, the StagingProductNavigationControlMenuEntry class calls its JSP like this:

    @Override
    public String getIconJspPath() {
        return "/control_menu/entry.jsp";
    }
    

    In particular, the entry.jsp is returned, which embeds the Staging Bar portlet into the Control Menu.

    You will also need to specify the servlet context from where you are loading the JSP files. If this is inside an OSGi module, make sure your bnd.bnd file has defined a web context path:

    Bundle-SymbolicName: com.sample.my.module.web
    Web-ContextPath: /my-module-web
    

    And then reference the Servlet context using the symbolic name of your module like this:

    @Override
    @Reference(
        target = "(osgi.web.symbolicname=com.sample.my.module.web)",
        unbind = "-"
    )
    public void setServletContext(ServletContext servletContext) {
        super.setServletContext(servletContext);
    }
    
  6. Define when to display your new entry in the Control Menu. As you’ve learned already, the Control Panel displays different entries depending on the page you’ve navigated to. You can specify when your entry should display using the isShow(HttpServletRequest) method.

    For example, the IndexingProductNavigationControlMenuEntry class queries the number of indexing jobs when calling isShow. If the query count is 0, then the indexing entry is not displayed in the Control Menu:

    @Override
    public boolean isShow(HttpServletRequest request) throws PortalException {
        int count = _indexWriterHelper.getReindexTaskCount(
            CompanyConstants.SYSTEM, false);
    
        if (count == 0) {
            return false;
        }
    
        return super.isShow(request);
    }
    

    The StagingProductNavigationControlMenuEntry class is selective over which pages to display for. The staging entry is configured to never display if the page is an administration page (e.g., Site Administration, My Account, etc.):

    @Override
    public boolean isShow(HttpServletRequest request) throws PortalException {
        ThemeDisplay themeDisplay = (ThemeDisplay)request.getAttribute(
            WebKeys.THEME_DISPLAY);
    
        Layout layout = themeDisplay.getLayout();
    
        // This controls if the page is an Administration Page
    
        if (layout.isTypeControlPanel()) {
            return false;
        }
    
        // This controls if Staging is enabled
    
        if (!themeDisplay.isShowStagingIcon()) {
            return false;
        }
    
        return true;
    }
    
  7. Define the dependencies for your Control Menu Entry. This should be completed in your build file (e.g., build.grade or pom.xml). For example, some popular dependencies (in Gradle format) are defined below:

    dependencies {
        compileOnly group: "com.liferay", name: "com.liferay.product.navigation.control.menu.api", version: "[VERSION]"
        compile group: "com.liferay", name: "com.liferay.product.navigation.taglib", version: "[VERSION]"
        compileOnly group: "com.liferay.portal", name: "com.liferay.portal.kernel", version: "[VERSION]"
        compileOnly group: "javax.servlet", name: "javax.servlet-api", version: "[VERSION]"
        compile group: "javax.servlet.jsp", name: "javax.servlet.jsp-api", version: "[VERSION]"
        compileOnly group: "org.osgi", name: "org.osgi.service.component.annotations", version: "[VERSION]"
    }
    

    Your project may require more dependencies, depending on your module’s functionality.

Excellent! You’ve created your entry in one of the three default panel categories in the Control Menu. You learned a basic way and an advanced way of providing that entry, and learned how to apply both.

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